School as Creative Space

Creativity

I’m a dancer, well more specifically I’m a dance teacher. And therein lies a fundamental difference. As a dancer I spent years training my body to follow patterns of movement and find both beauty and function in form. But as a dance teacher, I spend my time choreographing – creating. And it’s been here that I have found meaning in dance.

Marketers: It’s time to reinvent creativity

The performing arts are regarded as creative endeavors, but what we don’t always realise is that creativity is not inherent in any of these art forms – it’s a mindset and something that must be given space to develop. If a dance only ever learns what they are taught and never get’s a chance to choreograph – how much creativity are they really practising? Similarly, a musician exposed to the best of classical and modern music is not necessarily creative if they can only play but never compose. What creativity needs in order to thrive is opportunity, and it has not traditionally been then case that students are given time deliberately set aside to be creative.

Ken Robinson on creativity

But I believe schools can and should be creative spaces (see Sir Ken Robinson‘s talks for more detailed, eloquent and well researched reasons than I could give) because creativity is important. It’s not only what brightens our lives, and makes for great performances, it’s what keeps us trying new things, it’s what leads to innovative solutions, and new ways of doing things. And most importantly it feed our inner selves. In Kaupapa Maori, they talk about the mana atua, the divine spark that resides in all of us. Opportunities for creativity feed that spark.

You can’t use up creativity; the more you use, the more you have - Maya Angelou @QuoteResearch

So we now we know creativity needs opportunity to thrive, but we also need to recognise the breadth of areas that it’s possible to be creative in. I have seen students excel in creativity on the soccer pitch, seen brilliant creative reasoning in mathematics, and watched students argue the most intricate details in amazingly creative ways. If we believe that creativity is possible in any field, then we are starting to understand creativity as a mindset. As a mindset, or indeed a disposition, creativity grows in response to practice. Just like years of dance training strengthened my body, years of choreography have developed my creativity too. Practice comes in the form of activities designed to help students think beyond the mundane and into the novel. It’s a question asked by the teacher, but left answered or the thought that starts “I wonder if…” The final thing creativity really needs in order to thrive is constraint. An enabling constraint to be precise. Something which provides a limitation to work around – the creative challenge if you will. Sometimes simply a context, at other times a more explicit requirement.

Creativity vs. Art.

Just to recap. Creativity needs:

  • Opportunity
  • Recognition
  • Practice
  • Constraint

Creativity Poster - Andrea

So what does school as a creative place look like to me? It’s a space where student’s ask questions, solve problems and explore ideas. It’s multi-modal and highly interactive. It engages students in creative development. It’s supported by discussion and exemplification of the creative process by students, teachers and industry professionals. It acknowledges that creativity exists everywhere. It’s supported by structures that enable understanding – the SOLO taxonomy, systems thinking – and see everything as part of a whole. It’s developed and practiced through processes that foster ideation and iteration – design thinking, future problem solving. It’s a space where students can learn through doing and trying and failing upwards and failing forwards and starting over and turning the whole thing upside down. It’s acknowledging that there is never going to be one right way.

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